Coligny Calendar Based Daily Rituals

Amongst many different customs there is the notion of the daily offering. These are generally small offerings, said with a humble prayer, invocation, etc. The advantage of doing such rites is that it makes dêuocariâ (piety) a habit.

To quote Aristotle:

Excellence, then, being of these two kinds, intellectual and moral, intellectual excellence owes its birth and growth mainly to instruction, and so requires time and experience, while moral excellence is the result of habit or custom.” – written in ‘Nicomachean Ethics, Book II’

While it wouldn’t be correct to say that we developed the idea from this quote, it is quite fitting and the premise agreeable. When we can make our Îanoi (virtues) habits, we are more likely to stick to them. Doing so is incredibly important, as it means we are being good community members, and being right with ourselves. Furthermore, they are actions which are pleasing to the Dêuoi (worshipped beings).

In order to do this, to make the îanos (virtue) of dêuocariâ (piety) a habit, we devised a working system. We asked ourselves, “What kind of setup of daily rites may have made sense to a citizen of a Toutâ (nation, tribe)?”

In doing so, we looked to the most well known piece of Gaulish timekeeping — the Coligny Calendar, which you can read about here. From it, we were able to devise a methodology for daily adaððoues (rituals). We also aimed to keep the structure reasonably simple. It has the happily coincidental byproduct of helping one remember the current Coligny Calendar date.

For members of Bessus Nouiogalation (BNG), the full and consistent upkeep is only expected of those of the Dugilon tier. However, it is of course encouraged for all to attempt. For folks who aren’t, such a structure may be useful in developing one of your — or your group’s — own.

This structure applies to all months but there will be one difference between 29 and 30 day months that will be discussed later on. As this is a BNG setup, it should come as no surprise that each of our Toutâdeuoi (deities of a group/tribe/nation) are represented with a day each. For more on our Toutâdeuoi, as well as uediâs (invocations) for each, a treatise on them is available here.

The Breakdown

We use the Coligny Calendar app, designed by Ucetion.

Without further ado, from the beginning of the month, our structure is as follows:

Day:

1 – Ogmios (Ancestor of the Gauls)

2 – Toutatis (Guardian of the Toutâ)

3 – Suleuiâs (Good Guides)

4 – Materês (Knowers of fate, life givers)

5 – Regentiâ (ancestors)

6 – Dêuos of your choice.

7 – A “free space”. Any of the Dêuoi, or none. Though the former is strongly recommended. Also useful if there is a previous day that one missed.

This cycle repeats for days 8-14. Thus we arrive at the middle of the month.

15 – Carnonos (Way opener, guardian between worlds)

After which, the cycle of the first 14 days repeats. Which covers days 16-29. This means on day 30, another offering is given to Carnonos. However, if the month is only 29 days, Carnonos (unless one chose to give addatus, that is, offering to him on day 7, 14, 22, or 29) only gets one offering in that month.

This isn’t done as an intended slight against revered Carnonos, of course. In fact, we may recall that 30 day months which are marked matis (good, favourable, complete) and anmatis which is the opposite of matis. That space wasn’t made for the ever honourable, wise, and great Carnonos may be part of what makes 29 day months anmatis indeed!

A Few Potential Questions

All said, this schematic may raise questions. Such as: “What about Bituatîs (land beings)?” To which it can be said that generally these adaððoues (rites) are done indoors. Though indeed it could be possible to offer to them indoors, it is generally encouraged to meet them in their domains. This, and taking into account that the Gauls knew of cooler winters, and many places of very cold ones. As such, we didn’t want to put it on anyone to make such a trip in inclement weather when it may be unsafe.

Another salient question is “What if one wishes to do more than the amount of offerings in the structure? Or gives worship to more Dêuoi than the structure accommodates?” To which, it’s worth mentioning that what we’ve done here is merely provide a baseline. One can always do more. Those who do undoubtedly will easily be able to figure out a pattern that works for them. Whether it be multiple adaððoues in the same day, or simply offering to different Dêuoi on the two more open days.

Lastly, in the last two days of the seven day structure, one doesn’t have to stick to the same Dêuoi every week. It could be different Dêuoi each time. The free spots allow for either a set aside space for devotional relations, or a chance to build new relationships. Suiting both those with more and less experience in Galatibessus (Gaulish Custom).

Conclusion

The purpose is to build a habit of deuocariâ (piety). To this end, we introduce this Gaulish inspired method to carry out daily offerings, using a uniquely Gaulish calendar to do it. In doing so, it’s a way to both bolster our relationships with the Dêuoi, and strengthen Bessus (custom). This is a way to get started.

A simple offering suffices for these daily rites. One suggested item to offer would be incense. It’s generally accessible, affordable, and generally considered a good offering. Another recommendation would be to work these adaððoues (rituals) into one’s daily routine. When one wakes up, before one goes to bed, or after a bath or shower. Tying them to something else one does daily is very much helpful.

Earlier in this article, we provided both background and Uediâs (invocations) for Toutâdeuoi. For a selection of more widespread Dêuoi, we provide some Uediâs here. With all of this, one has all of the information they need to start. We hope that within, we have provided a methodology that allows one to make a habit of piety.

May the Dêuoi look favourably upon the attempt, and may they give blessings to you all.

** A special thanks to one of our Sentiiâ, Rianorix, for her questions. And to all members of BNG who helped give shape to the idea of the Coligny Calendar based adaððoues.

Uediâs (Invocations)

The main language used is Nouiogalaticos, a constructed revival based Gaulish dialect. And they will be translated to English, or if one uses a translator, whatever language they like. Though one doesn’t have to speak Nouiogalaticos to perform rituals, it’s nice to add a few words of it to give the rites a more Gaulish feel. Again, it’s not a “must” but it’s fair to assume one probably wants to use at least some.

The Nouiogalaticos will be shown first, and the English will be in parentheses (). So, if you need to translate into something other than English, only translate what is in parentheses ().

Also these letters “Д and “ð” make a “ts” sound.

One who has been in Gaulish custom for some time will notice a few of the same words (in the Eponâ and Taranis ones), and some of the structure (the three lines of praise) of the invocations are like those of Segomâros Widugeni. Which can be seen on his site and in his book, ‘Ancient Fire’. His invocations are a big influence on our own.

The following are invocations you can use in simple rituals to call on Dêuoi and give offerings to them. Thus participating in Sumatreiâ (good relationship) with them. Now there are over 300 Gaulish deities, and this isn’t going to be an exhaustive list. However, we can provide some here.

What we will do here is break the invocations into two halves. In the first half of the invocation one of course invoke the recipient of the ritual, they then describe the recipient with a few epithets. As well as a statement about them and what they may do in lore. We then give them offering and thanks.

The second half is what we might request of them, and the closing of the ritual. As we may ask different things of them, we have prepared several possible second halves. This allows you to know what you are asking for if you choose to do so in Gaulish. In any other language, we trust you can find the words.

Without further ado… Cintusimîs Uediânon (First Halves of the Invocations)



Uediâ Abnobî
(Invocation for Abnobâ)


Uediomos/Uediumii Abnobân
(We/I invoke Abnobâ)

Donâ allation
(Lady of the wilds)

Riganâ selgiâs
(Queen of the hunt)

Arpos noxtos
(Bow and arrow of the night)


Conateregiâ Argiiâs, gninomos gussus adiantî
(With the rising of the moon, we learn the value of effort)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Aisous
(Invocation for Aisus)


Uediomos/Uediumî Aisun
(We/I invoke Aisus)

Nemetorix
(King of the Nemeton)

Tigernos aidous
(Lord of the Fire)

Delgaunos Drous
(Keeper of Drus)

Das uiððus contoutî, caddocerdâs iton
(You give wisdom to the people, your sacred arts)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addauts] [Offering]

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Uediâ Alaunî
(Invocation for Alaunâ)


Uediomos/Uediumî Alaunan
(We/I invoke Alaunâ)

Cintus in leucê
(First in the light)

Dêuâ Ratî
(Dêuâ of generosity)

Bertiâ ituos
(Bearer of food)

Donâ areuari, rodâi nouiorasson conateregî sonnî
(Lady before the dawn, you give new hope with the rising sun)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Artionê
(Invocation for Artiû
)


Uediomos/Uediumî Artionen
(We/I invoke Artiû)

Riganâ ueltîs
(Queen of the wild)

Matîr nerticos
(Mighty mother)

Boudi uasanti
(Triumph of the spring)

Matîr arti, auetâ londâ, uedestûnis diuobin uellûs
(Mother of bears, wild protectress, you guide us to better days)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Auetî
(Invocation for Auetâ)


Uediomos/Uediumî Auetân
(We/I invoke Auetâ)

Uiððudonâ caddâ
(Holy Wise Woman)

Caradataunâ
(She who gives care)

Beraunâ agranion
(Bearer of the fruits)

Sistai areabonî, matîr andecarâ aiui, boudilanâ condatouibi
(You stand by the river, ever gentle mother, generous with gifts)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Belinû
(Invocation for Belinos)


Uediomos/Uediumî Belinon
(We/I invoke Belinos)

Bertos leuci
(Bearer of light)

Cingetos nemê
(Warrior in the sky)

Deuorbutos sergionon
(Vanquisher of diseases)

Dêuos berxtos, latis eporedios, esi londos urittoclamoi ollâ
(Shining Dêuos, horse riding hero, you are fierce against all illnesses)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Brigindonâ
(Invocation for Brigindû
)


Uediomos/Uediumî Brigindunen
(We/I invoke Brigindû)

Morênâ catoues
(Maiden of war)

Uernâ dunassiâs
(Guardian of the fortress)

Riganâ boudês
(Queen of victory)

Tenos uer bannî, gaisos etic cladios danacâ, boudi in lamî
(Fire upon the peak, spear and sword gifted, victory in hand)


Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Camulû
(Invocation for Camulos)


Uediomos/Uediumî Camulon
(We/I invoke Camulos)

Rix catuos
(King of battle)

Cladios boudicos
(Victorious sword)

Cingetos bouarios
(Noble warrior)

Baros molti, steros etic sontios, uices dagû olli
(Fury of the ram, steadfast and true, you fight for the good of all)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Carnonû
(Invocation for Carnonos)


Uediomos/Uediumî Carnonon
(We/I invoke Carnonos)

Uernos mantali
(Warden of the roads)

Entar bitoues
(Between worlds)

Anextlios Ecuon
(He Who Protects the Herds)

Antû Dubni sistâi, anegestû uritto namantobi etic uedes anatin
(At the border of Dubnos you stand, you protect against enemies and guide souls)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Catuboduî
(Invocation for Catuboduâ)


Uediomos/Uediumî Catuboduan
(We/I invoke Catuboduâ)

Messuaunâ galliâs
(Measurer of valor)

Barnaunâ argonon
(Judge of the worthy)

Riganâ Cingeti
(Queen of warriors)

Ueretrû iton, areuedestû argos comarion uellin
(Upon your wings, you carry the worthy to a better place)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Ðironî
(Invocation for Sironâ)


Uediomos/Uediumî Ðironan
(We/I invoke Sironâ)

Cintuðirâ nemê
(First star in the sky)

Matîr uoberi
(Mother of the springs)

Liagis lobri
(Healer of the sick)

Cintus extemellû, delgestû tudauon diion uellon
(First from the darkness, you hold the promise of better days)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering] 

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Uediâ Entarabou
(Invocation for Entarabus)


Uediomos/Uediiumi Entarabun
(We/I invoke Entarabus)

Uernos nantunon
(Guardian of the valleys)

Delgaunos Condation
(Keeper of the confluence)

Mapos iriiaciton
(Son of the fertile plains)

Ondê caddoialon, delges ueiâ raton
(In that sacred meeting place, you hold the power of blessings)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratun te
(We give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Eponî
(Invocation
for Eponâ)


Uediomos/Uediumî Eponan
(We/I invoke Eponâ)

Riganâ uercariâs
(Queen of the fertile land)

Deuâ ulatês
(Dêuâ of the sovereign land)

Riganâ messous
(Queen of the Harvest)

Eporediâ entar bitoues, rodâi boudin ollon
(Rider between worlds, you give bounty to all)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn tê
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Gobanû
(Invocation for Gobanos)


Uediomos/Uediumî Gobanon
(We/I invoke Gobannos)

Alaunos bituos
(Wanderer of the world)

Ordos prii
(Hammer of creating)

Tigernos teni
(Master of the fire)

Nertolamâs etic ordomâros, rodâi crittâ galletiûs nouiûs
(Mighty hands and great hammer, you give shape to new possibilities)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Grannû
(Invocation for Grannos)


Uediomos/Uediumî Grannon
(We/I invoke Grannos)

Delgaunos onobîias
(Holder of the water of life)

Tenos in dubrê
(Fire in the water)

Caniuolcos nerticos
(Mighty valiant hero)

Amarcolitanus, Liagimâros etic delgaunos runâs elus
(He with the far piercing sight, great healer and keeper of secrets)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Lugou
(Invocation for Lugus)


Uediomos/Uediumî Lugun
(We/I invoke Lugus)

Tigernos cerdânon
(Master of the arts)

Rix corii
(King of the warband)

Latis caili
(Hero of destiny)

Gaisos in lamî, uissus in britû, creddâ olli in te
(Spear in hand, knowledge in mind, faith of all in you)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Maponû
(Invocation to Maponos)


Uediomos/Uediumî Maponon
(We/I invoke Maponos)

Bardos aneuetos
(Inspired Bardos)

Mapað leuci
(Child of Light)

Delgaunos brixtânon
(Keeper of Magics)

Leucomâros etic nertoiouantus, ueiâ etic biuos ollaiui
(Great light and a strong youth, energy and life eternal)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Matrêbo
(Invocation for the Mothers)


Uediomos/Uediumî Materês
(We/I invoke the Materês)

Biuotus rodamaunâs
(Life givers)

Noibos maiamos
(Most holy)

Uissuaunâs tonceton
(Knowers of fates)

In geni, biuotû, etic maruê, uednis etic messus ollon
(In birth, life, and death, guiding and measuring us all)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn suos
(We/I give offering and thanks to you all)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Nantosueltî
(Invocation for Nantosueltâ)

Uediomos/Uediumî Nantosueltian
(We/I invoke Nantosueltâ)

Matîr marâ
(Great mother)

Delgaunâ uenios
(Keeper of pleasures)

Riganâ lanobitous
(Queen of the world of plenty)

Magloi buiont ûros corinon iton, rodarcon suanciton
(The fields become green with your touch, a welcome sight)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Nemetonî
(Invocation for Nemetonâ)

Uediomos/Uediumî Nemetonan
(We/I invoke Nemetonâ)

Donâ anton
(Lady of the Borders)

Uernâ caddî
(Guardian of the Sacred)

Delgaunâ Marâ
(The Great Keeper)

Rodâi caddiâ uentân, etic aneges urittoduscaxslâ
(You give sacredness to the offering space, and you protect against bad spirits)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratun te
(We give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus – Offering] 

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Uediâ Ogmiû
(Invocation for Ogmios)

Uediomos/Uediumî Ogmion
(We/I invoke Ogmios)

Cintuatîr Galation
(First father of the Galatîs)

Mârolabâtis
(Great speaker)

Belolatis
(Mighty hero)

Excenu bebanastû, uxelliâ Galation, rodîssestûnis anuan anson
(From far you came, pride of the Galatîs, you gave us our name)

Rodîmos/Rodîumî adbertâ etic bratûn tê
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Rosmertî
(Invocation for Rosmertâ)

Uediomos/Uediumî Rosmertan
(We/I invoke Rosmertâ)

Riganâ corii
(Queen of the warband)

Rataunâ meniâs
(Bestower of wealth)

Matîr uolugon
(Sustaining mother)

Marauetâ, raies brigon etic suraton colargotuð
(Great protectress, you bestow power and good fortune with generosity)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Rudiobou
(Invocation for Rudiobus)


Uediomos/Uediumî Rudiobun
(We/I invoke Rudiobus)

Cingetomâros
(Great warrior)

Soldurios couîros
(Loyal defender)

Epoð boudicos
(Victorious knight)

Dercâ exuerarduiâs, carantos exobnos toutiâs
(The eyes from upon the hill, fearless friend of the people)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Sucellû
(Invocation for Sucellos)


Uediomos/Uediumî Sucellon
(We/I invoke Sucellos)

Atîr Raton
(Generous father)

Medos candosocci
(Caretaker of the vines/shoots)

Uernos bitoues
(Watcher of realms)

Deluâunos textiâs magliâs, randestû textâs iton cotoutin
(Shaper of the gifts of the land, you share your gifts with the people)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Suleuiâbo
(Invocation for the Suleuiâs)


Uediomos/Uediumî Suleuiâs
(We/I invoke the Suleuiâs)

Uernâs uissoues
(Wise guardians)

Delgaunâs rextion
(Keepers of right)

Aminâs uîrisamâs
(Truest friends)

Esue leucos îani uedetesuîs ollon
(You all are the light of virtue, you guide us all)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn suos
(We/I give offering and thanks to you all)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Taranê
(Invocation for Taranis
)

Uediomos/Uediumî Taranin
(We/I invoke Taranis)

Nemorix
(Lord of the Sky)

Dêuos Rotî
(Dêuos of the Wheel)

Delgaunos Uîridi
(Keeper of Truth)

Delgestû loucetion etic anegestû ollon
(You hold the lightning and you protect all)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(We/I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

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Uediâ Uesunnî
(Invocation for Uesunnâ)

Uediomos/Uediumî Uesunna
(We invoke Uesunnâ)

Bertaunâ Dagocobî
(Bringer of good luck)

Donâ Ratî
(Lady of grace)

Suanextlaunâ
(Good protectress)

Rodâs sutonceton etic beres catubrixtâs
(You grant good fate and bear the battle magics)

Rodâmos/Rodâmî addatus etic bratun te
(We give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering] 

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Allosimi Uediânon (Second half of the invocations)

We have provided invocations for some deities. Within, we covered most of a simple invocation. If you have a request during such a rite, this is the time to include it. For those doing rituals in a language other than Gaulish, it’s okay to ask in your own words. Though you should develop a formula.

We will include some in Gaulish, and will translate the formula used in the Gaulish invocations. We will give words for things one may request, and for whom.

Arcimâs (Requests)

Arcîmos/Arcîumî _________

(We/I ask for _________)

All of these requests are in dative case, meaning an indirect object. In this case, the dative will imply asking for something.

slanû – health

anextlû – protection

calonnî – resolve

gallî – courage, confidence

uiridû – justice

ratû – grace, blessing

ratobo – blessings

sedû – peace

agnê – guidance

nertû – strength

boudê – victory

ianobitoû – prosperity

An example:

Arcîmos/Arcîumî slanû

(We/I ask for health)

Now for whom you may ask for blessings. In Gaulish, we will use the accusative case. That means referring to the direct object of a sentence. So, who we are asking the blessing or request to be directed to. If it is for yourself, then the line above is good enough. But what about for someone else?

Some examples of people or groups to ask for in Gaulish are as follows:

uenian – family

carantâs – friends

contreban –  city, town, village, community

mapaten anson/imon – child (of ours/mine)

mapatâs anson/imon – children (of ours/mine)

regenion anson/imon – parent (of ours/mine)

regeniâ anson/imon – parents (of ours/mine)

Galatîs – fellow Galatîs

Nouiogalatîs – fellow Nouiogalatîs

ollon – all people

tluxtiûs – the poor, needy

lobrûs – the sick

scasstâ – the hurt, injured

tegesicâ – the workers

bitun – the world

A final example for the full sentence:

Arcîmos/Arcîumî sedû bitun

(We/I ask for peace to the world)

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Clauiiâ (Closing)

When there is only one recipient, these are the lines to use in Gaulish:

Slanon te

(Cheer to you)

Bratûn te

(Thanks to you)

Molâmos te/Molâmî te

(We/I praise you)

When there are multiple recipients only the last line changes. Instead of tû, you use suos.

The final line altogether to close is:

Iâmos/Iâiumî in sedê

(We/I go in peace)

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Cintudricâ Uediâs (Example of an invocation)

This is what a full invocation may look like:

Uediumî Eponan
(I invoke Eponâ)

Riganâ uercariâs
(Queen of the fertile land)

Deuâ ulatês
(Goddess of the sovereign land)

Riganâ messous
(Queen of the Harvest)

Eporediâ entar bitoues, rodâi boudin ollon
(Rider between worlds, you give bounty to all)

Rodâmî addatus etic bratûn te
(I give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus] [Offering]

Arcîumî ratobo Galatîs
(I ask for blessings to the Galatîs)

Slanon te
(Cheer to you)

Bratûn te
(Thanks to you)

Molâmî Eponan
(I praise you Eponâ)

Iâiumî in tancê
(I go in peace)


That was a sample ritual. And this is a way we have developed to do invocations. The complexity is certainly present if one does them in Gaulish, but over time, it gets easier as with any other language.

Remember, that you don’t have to do the entire invocation in Gaulish if you don’t feel comfortable. And you can always do them with some Gaulish, and some of your usual language. It takes a little effort to do invocations in rituals right. However, we know that you can do it!

Together, we can bring back worship of our Dêuoi and can build a new Galatibessus (Gaulish Custom). And we invite you all to join us.

Suauelos tê! (Good winds to you!)

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Tegobessus I: Sacred Space

Choose a place in which to do Dugiion, that is worship in your home. If you live in a fancy and/or very rustic establishment, you might already have something like a hearth. Odds are, you don’t. In that case, simply use a good surface as an Uentâ, or place of offering/sacrifice. This place will be the focal point of your Tegobessus (House Custom).

Place relevant stuff on it. At minimum, a candle and a bowl. Images or symbols of Dêuoi are all the better! Added dishes for offerings are fine too. Optimally, you’ll want this to face Ari (East). If not Ari, then try Dexouâ (South). If it has to face Eri (West) or Tutos (North), so be it. While East is optimal, something is better than nothing.

Now, what to put upon this Uentâ? At bare minimum you’ll need a Cumbâ (Bowl, also means “valley”, but is not pertinent to this) and a Dagilâ (candle). Whether or not it’s electric isn’t a big deal. But these are the bare minimums. The Cumbâ to hold the Addatus (offering), the Dagilâ for the Aidû (flame), of course.

Of course, many will want to add Deluâs (images) of various Dêuoi (Worshipped Beings). Or symbols: A Rotos (wheel) for Taranis, an Epos (horse) related symbol for Eponâ, and so on. These certainly add character and help focus attention in a ritual on the deuos in question.

We have the why and how. Now for the when:

Planning rites are essential. Try to do them on a regular basis. The point is not to be perfect but to make an attempt at regularity. Do your best, but don’t beat yourself up over not being perfect. Just make it a goal to do the rites on a regular basis. This will allow for a rhythm to your rituals.

There are plenty of intervals on which one might choose to do rites. They could be done daily, weekly, bi-monthly, but at minimum once a month. Another suggestion is moon phases.

One of the most important things to do before a Rite is that of Glanosâgon (Purification). That means making yourself clean and ritually pure. To do this, you may wish to bathe or shower before ritual. At the least it is important to wash the hands and face. As the Gauls were known for using soap, some kind of bar soap would be a nice continuation of that tradition.

Wash hands and say: Glanolamâs “Clean hands”
Swipe your forehead and say:  Glanobritus “Clean mind”
Swipe down the face with both hands and say: Glananation “Clean soul” (This is based on the idea of the soul residing in the head.)

Purify the sacred space

One must purify the sacred space. To do this, we will invoke Nemetonâ. This is vital to establish your space or making a new one.
We will use Juniper as this was used by the Senogalatis to clear away snakes and to help with bits from poisonous creatures. So we will use it to clear away any unwanted energies in our space.
You will now need a Dagilâ (Candle) to represent Aidona.

Light your Juniper and walk around your area or make a motion around your area in a sunwise circle three times to represent the three realms of Drus (AlbiosBitus, and Dubnos). As you do this, say the below invocation.

Uediumii Nemetonan
(I invoke Nemetonâ)

Donâ anton
(Lady of the Borders)

Uernâ caddî
(Guardian of the Sacred)

Delgaunâ Marâ
(The Great Keeper)

Rodâi caddiâ uentân, etic aneges urittoduscaxslâ
(You give sacredness to the offering space, and you protect against bad spirits)

Rodâmî addatus etic bratun te
(We give offering and thanks to you)

[Addatus – Offering]

Arciumî sinuenti bîeto uregetor caddos io
(I ask that this place be made sacred)

Slanon te
(Cheer to you)

Bratun te
(Thanks to you)

Molâmî Nemetoni
(I praise Nemetonâ)

Uregar
(It is done)

Welcoming Aidona

Aidonâ is the name we give to the spirit of the fire; basically, the hearth personified. We are introducing Aidonâ into our space for the first time so this is a very important step for us.

After the invocation, say
Oibelumî (Oibelomos) sinaidû Aidoniâs.
I light (We light) this flame of Aidonâ.

Say some words welcoming Aidonâ
This is very personal and needs to come from you.

[Addatus – Offering]
After the offering, take a few moments to kneel, bow, or sit and commune with the recipient(s)

Bratûn te,
Aidonan

(Thanks to you,
Aidonâ)


Take a moment of Tauson (Silence).