Gregorian Holiday Dates for the Upcoming Coligny Calendar Year

This cycle is for the year 2604 AAC (18:00 8 May 202217:59 27 May 2023).Continue reading “Gregorian Holiday Dates for the Upcoming Coligny Calendar Year”

Anegion Taranês (Taranis’s Blessing)

Anegion Taranês

Written By Suturcos

Taranis bûe ad tancê

Taruoi eio urextont lanos

Beborbar ara etû blandû

Boues rodîssont blixtus blandus

Ollon buont lanos etic lauenos

Eni sindos diuobi dagobi au sami

Papodius bûe samos

Acitâ ûrâ do aiui

Taranis bûe anuosagitis

Sioxti toutâ doxtont eion

Sepîssonteîa au Crîni

Ueuaseîs rodanon eionon

Crînos gabâsset ollon

Cecameîs rodanon

Eticsiodeîs uer berû

Nauinicos etic tarsusicos

Toutâ uouâdar dû uoretû

Taranis cucloue uediâs eionon

Aisus dedosse brogilos

Duxtir eio Nemetonâ rodîsset

Suanciton etic comarciaton Taranin

Gutuatis dedoue aidûn

Etic rodîsset oigetocâriâ

Do Tigernin Taranin

Eni brogilê râdîssont au Crîni

Cauaros ne cingeð gegalle gonti

Câdareîa tâios etic blinos ion uexti

Dirisetos congestlos eio Belenin

Sindos gestlos Bononiâ exuinnâsset

Tetogiîs deuoressi Crînos

Iâssetîs uritet Crînin uer catumagê

Namanð luciicos, cennâ caletâ etic brussâ

Dercâ eio mextâcâ etic cuuâ, maruicos

Sioxti, Taranis ôde uresson excenos

Ex Crînû bûe anderon, conuidu dextos

Taranis delxti lorgâ eio, Leuceton

Tatanð rodani, eni leucê diuos

Dedosseîs dû catû, entar locâtiê

Au uolti roudi uicii, gutus eni uersî

Crînos delxti cladios eio, etic ceconge

Taranis ueurite beltâ dû beltî, balcos

Condariâ, condariâ, catus coui iâsset

Taranis râdîsset uoxtloi au nitigi

Sinnitigon ne bisiû bâu

Etic ûxamâssetîs Leuceton, bibeîs!

Eni pettî gellî Crînos bogi, aulautos bûe

Taranis bibe bundâ etic râdîsset anegion

“An dagouersâ rinet sindagobundin”

“Rodîumî adbertâ au biuotous”

“Rodîumî adbertâ au brigi”

“Rodîumî adbertâ au bounoniî”

Uoberon atelinâsset, etic rodanâ ateberti

Toutâ rodîssont braton do Taranin

Rodîssont boues, baraos, etic medus

Toutâ comberton eni litû

Sindiu essi iexti Samolitus

Taranis, argos toutîas commantos essi

Taranis’s Blessing

Taranis was at peace

His bulls were made full

They fed on sweet pasture

The cows yielded sweet milk

All were full and happy

In those good days of summer

Each day was summer

The fields were always green

Taranis was unchallenged

However, the people came to Him

They spoke of Crînos

He devoured their fields

Crînos took all

He stole the crops

He sat upon the well

Hungry and thirsty

The people pleaded for help

Taranis heard their pleas

Aisus prepared the grove

His daughter Nemetonâ gave

Welcome and greeting to Taranis

The priest had lit the fire

And gave hospitality

To the lord Taranis

In the grove they spoke of Crînos

A giant no warrior was able to kill

They fell hot and tired when they tried

As sure as the mutual oath to Belenos

That oath Bononiâ witnessed

He swore to vanquish Crînos

He went to meet Crînos on the battlefield

A strange enemy, skin hard and brittle

Eyes sunken and hollow, like death

Yet, Taranis felt heat from afar

From Crînos was the origin, like burning wood

Taranis held His (club, staff?), Leuceton

The thief of the yield, in the light of day

He prepared for battle, in the sight

Of the red haired champion, the voice in the rain

Crînos held his sword and advanced

Taranis met blow for blow, powerful

Raging, raging, the battle thus went

Taranis spoke words of a curse

This curse I will not utter

And he raised Leuceton, he struck!

In a thousand pieces Crînos broke, he washed away

Taranis struck the ground and spoke a blessing

“May good rain reach the good ground”

“I give offering of life”

“I give offering of strength”

“I give offering of prosperity”

The well refilled, and the crops returned

The people gave thanks to Taranis

They gave cows, bread, and mead

The people came together to feast

Today it is called Samolitus

Taranis, the champion of the people is remembered

Anegion Taranês

Taranis bûe ad tancê

Taruoi eio urextont lanos

Beborbar ara etû blandû

Boues rodîssont blixtus blandus

Ollon buont lanos etic lauenos

Eni sindos diuobi dagobi au sami

Papodius bûe samos

Acitâ ûrâ do aiui

Taranis bûe anuosagitis

Sioxti toutâ doxtont eion

Sepîssonteîa au Crîni

Ueuaseîs rodanon eionon

Crînos gabâsset ollon

Cecameîs rodanon

Eticsiodeîs uer berû

Nauinicos etic tarsusicos

Toutâ uouâdar dû uoretû

Taranis cucloue uediâs eionon

Aisus dedosse brogilos

Duxtir eio Nemetonâ rodîsset

Suanciton etic comarciaton Taranin

Gutuatis dedoue aidûn

Etic rodîsset oigetocâriâ

Do Tigernin Taranin

Eni brogilê râdîssont au Crîni

Cauaros ne cingeð gegalle gonti

Câdareîa tâios etic blinos ion uexti

Dirisetos congestlos eio Belenin

Sindos gestlos Bononiâ exuinnâsset

Tetogiîs deuoressi Crînos

Iâssetîs uritet Crînin uer catumagê

Namanð luciicos, cennâ caletâ etic brussâ

Dercâ eio mextâcâ etic cuuâ, maruicos

Sioxti, Taranis ôde uresson excenos

Ex Crînû bûe anderon, conuidu dextos

Taranis delxti lorgâ eio, Leuceton

Tatanð rodani, eni leucê diuos

Dedosseîs dû catû, entar locâtiê

Au uolti roudi uicii, gutus eni uersî

Crînos delxti cladios eio, etic ceconge

Taranis ueurite beltâ dû beltî, balcos

Condariâ, condariâ, catus coui iâsset

Taranis râdîsset uoxtloi au nitigi

Sinnitigon ne bisiû bâu

Etic ûxamâssetîs Leuceton, bibeîs!

Eni pettî gellî Crînos bogi, aulautos bûe

Taranis bibe bundâ etic râdîsset anegion

“An dagouersâ rinet sindagobundin”

“Rodîumî adbertâ au biuotous”

“Rodîumî adbertâ au brigi”

“Rodîumî adbertâ au bounoniî”

Uoberon atelinâsset, etic rodanâ ateberti

Toutâ rodîssont braton do Taranin

Rodîssont boues, baraos, etic medus

Toutâ comberton eni litû

Sindiu essi iexti Samolitus

Taranis, argos toutîas commantos essi

Îuoi (Holidays)

Jump to the list of Îuoi (Holidays)

As with any other custom, a Gaulish custom one needs holidays. Those special times of year where we come together to observe specific Dêuoi for specific reasons. As well as attuning ourselves to the cycle of the seasons and what that means for us. Bessus Nouiogalation is no exception.

In a previous article, we talked about the Sequanni Calendar. The IVOS clusters on the calendar are thought to denote holidays. That being the case, it gives us an idea of where to put at least some holidays. Therefore, it’s fitting to use those clusters to put forth a kind of list of holidays. Along with that, using their placements in the year, we’ll try to use that as a guide to figure out both what to call these holidays and what they may be about. In this way, even if we don’t know the original traditions, we can be inspired to develop some of our own.

For reference sake, we use the BNG Coligny Calendar designed by Ucetion. We feel that they have put together a great working model of the calendar, and we are proud of Ucetion for putting it together. Helen Mckay’s work here is an excellent companion to it.

In the history of the calendar, the length of an age, or where the calendar completed its cycle, went from 30 to 25 years as time went by. As the Metonic cycle is the most accurate as far as lunisolar timekeeping goes, as without it, there is quite an eventual drift. It seems to be a good borrowing. This puts the calendar’s full cycle at 19 years. Remembering that the calendar was originally in a temple to Apollo, who was said to make a journey to the land of the Hyperboreans (a mythic people who lived “beyond the lands of the Celts”) every 19 years. So, it’s far from the least plausible leap.

By retaining the names of the months and being able to keep up with the same methodology of a lunisolar calendar, we see a synthesis of retaining the old while being able to adapt and borrow as the Gauls themselves did.

So, with that reference noted, we should also say that even without the Metonic adaptation, the holidays are still in the same time range. Though the purpose of this article is not to discuss the calendar, we wanted to give some background into the frame of reference we use for the holidays. What we see when looking at the calendar is that there are several points in the year where the notation ‘IVOS’ is attached to several days in a row.

As Iuos notations cluster around certain times of the year, it can be assumed that they are likely holidays. It cannot be said for sure how long a given holiday was observed. As the clusters may point to a range of time in which it was acceptable to observe a given holiday. The pain with the Iuos clusters is that though they are consistent, they still show up in different months on the calendar throughout the years.

Though intercalations are involved with that slight distortion, the timing of the holidays themselves are actually completely consistent. So, on the calendar, the clusters will show up on one month or one other, two at the most. However, it is still consistent because these clusters are marked by one specific moon. In other words, an Iuos cluster may show up around 1 Simiuisonna one year, and near 1 Equos the next, but it will be the same moon in the lunar cycle.

The months start at the first quarter moon, in line with Pliny the Elder’s statement that the Gauls started their months six days after the new moon. This assumes a first quarter start, and a first quarter moon is easily visible. If this sounds confusing, and it did to me at first, it will be made clear now in this list of holidays. Remember that the moon is your friend. Without further ado, the holidays of Bessus Nouiogalation:

  • Sonnocingos Nouios “New Year” – This one needs the calendar linked above for reference.  As it’s the first day on the calendar itself. 1 Samonios is the date most years. Whenever there is an intercalary month of Quimonios, it is 1 Quimonios.
  • Diios Nouiogalation “Day of the New Galatîs” – The Birthday of Bessus Nouiogalation always falls on is 9 Samoni.
  • Cintusamos “Start of Summer” – Always two first quarter moons before the summer solstice.
  • Samolitus “Summer Festival” – Always the first quarter moon before the summer solstice.
  • Trinox Samoni “Three nights of Samonios” – This one also requires the app linked above. Starts on 17 Samonios. Usually, the third quarter moon closest to the summer solstice. However, it can be on or just after it. No more than a week after.
  • Cerdolitus “Crafting Feast” – Third quarter moon before Cintumessus below.
  • Cintumessus “First Harvest” – Always two first quarter moons after the summer solstice.
  • Catus Alisiâs “Battle of Alessia” – Third quarter moon closest to the autumn equinox. Always 17 Ogronios.
  • Cintugiamos “Start of Winter” – Two first quarter moons before the winter solstice.
  • Giamolitus “Winter Feast” – Full moon closest to the winter solstice.
  • Adbiuos “To Life, Quickening” – Two first quarter moons after the winter solstice.
  • Uisonnalitus “Spring Feast” – Just after the new moon closest to the spring equinox.
  • Gregorian Holiday Dates for the Upcoming Coligny Calendar Year
  • Îuoi in Îanê (Holidays in Virtue)

These are the holidays, or as has been jested about “Gaulidays” that we have come to a conclusion upon. At a later date, we will look at each holiday in depth. Until then, thanks for reading!